Our feline animal friends can suffer with dental problems especially when they are elderly

Our older cats can be vulnerable to many problems like arthritis, obesity, hearing problems, thyroid and dental issues, especially when they get older.

Tooth and gum disease are common in cats, and can be painful, even though they can often continue eating regardless of the pain so always look out for signs of any problems. If a dental issue goes untreated it can lead to major problems such as heart or kidney disease. It is important to have their teeth checked regularly and always keep a close check on whether they have any problems in their mouth.  

They can get a disease in which teeth dissolve at the roots. Feeding cats dried biscuits are considered a little better for their teeth because it helps to remove some plaque as they chew. Breeds like Persians and Maine Coon are likely to suffer from dental disease. Their diet plays an important factor in their dental health, so a balanced nutritional diet is essential as is regular dental check-ups.  Here are some symptoms to look out for. 

  • Pain in the mouth
  • Bad breath
  • Problems with eating
  • Tartar or sore gums
  • Drooling
  • Weight loss

Some problems our fury pals can get: Tartar and Plaque build-up – this is when there is a build-up of saliva and bacteria on the teeth and this eventually hardens which is called tartar. This can damage teeth and cause gingivitis (inflamed gums which is also painful).

Tooth decays can develop along the gum line, which is painful and can cause teeth to break, this is called Feline resorptive lesions (FORLs).

Gingivitis – caused by plaque and tartar build-up which can cause inflamed gums which are red, sensitive, painful that bleed easily. In some severe cases it can spread to the whole mouth, which is called gingivostomatitis. This is a severe form of Gingivitis, which is when the immune system overreacts to plaque, tartar, and conditions like cat flu.

There are many different treatments available depending on the dental problem. If you are ever worried or concerned contact your vet as soon as possible for advice and help.